Choosing If Personal Insolvency Is Right For You - Problems To Think About

When you start the process of filing for bankruptcy, you are making the claim that you do not have the money you need to pay your bills. The reasoning behind the lack of funds, does not play any role in the court's decision to accept your petition. Use the tips below to help you through this difficult and confusing process.

Bankruptcy is a very complicated, and scary process. Usually anyone who applies for it, is at the end of ones rope. To help you feel more in control of things, be sure to educate yourself about the entire process before making your decision. Learn the requirements you have to meet before applying.Learn about what the process will be when you do apply.Finally, learn how your future will be affected by it after you file.



If you are being faced with home foreclosure, wage garnishments or other situations that make it necessary to file for bankruptcy quickly, you may want to explore an emergency filing. Regular bankruptcy filings entail approximately 50 pages of paperwork and one to two weeks for an attorney to pull everything together. In an emergency filing, your attorney can file just the first 2 necessary pages and keep creditors from continuing foreclosure or garnishment proceedings. The rest of the work will be completed afterward.

A critical tip in filing personal bankruptcy is to steer clear of making payments to creditors, in advance of filing a petition, in an attempt to satisfy individual debts in full outside of bankruptcy court. Payments to family members and creditors made within defined periods of time prior to a bankruptcy filing can be voided and can jeopardize the chances of receiving a discharge of all debts in the case.

If you are planning to file for bankruptcy in the near future, don't charge up your credit cards thinking that you won't have to pay back the debt. In just click the next website page , there are rules about how much credit card debt and what kind, may be discharged in a bankruptcy. For instance, if you make purchases for luxury items, such as an expensive new TV, within 6 months prior to filing, you may be obligated to pay that amount back. On the other hand, if you used your credit card to purchase groceries, or other necessities, the rules may be different. Be sure to ask your attorney for advice.

Meet with many different attorneys before making any decision on one. To do this, you must start looking well in advance of when you need to file. If you wait until the last minute, you will not have the time to find an attorney that will give you good advice, and one that is easy to work with.

Remember that certain kinds of debt won't be discharged even after you have filed for bankruptcy. If you have outstanding student loans, owe child or spousal support, a divorce settlement agreement, or unpaid taxes, you will still be liable for these debts. Also, if you forget to list certain debts on your court documents, you won't be able to add them in the future.

Know the difference between Chapters 7 and 13 bankruptcies. Chapter 7 will wipe your debts clean, meaning you will not owe what you file against. Chapter 13 requires you to agree to repay your debts. These debts need to be repaid within three to five years of the filing date.


Don't make the mistake of hesitating to file for bankruptcy because you think you won't be able to file again and may need to save it for a worse financial situation. The laws vary from state to state, but you may file again after a certain period, usually two to eight years, depending on the type of bankruptcy filed. Of course, you won't want to file again, but in case of job loss or a major illness, the opportunity is there if you need it.

Knowing that you are required to disclose anything that you have sold, given away or transferred in the two years prior to filing can help you avoid a costly mistake. Full disclosure is required. Not disclosing everything can land you in jail or a discharge of your personal bankruptcy petition.

Be selective. You may have learned that you must continue to pay for auto and home loans, and to stop paying your credit card bills immediately. That money could be put to much better use somewhere else. Continuing payments on these accounts is wasted money. Apply it to the lines of credit that you plan to keep.

When you file bankruptcy, you want to avoid finding yourself in similar dire financial circumstances, so planning for and making a post-bankruptcy budget is a good idea. When you can create such a budget and stick to it after bankruptcy, you are far less likely to find yourself in the same position in the future, ensuring you are more financially free.

Never rely upon bill collectors to share accurate information about your debt and bankruptcy. Some unethical collectors tell consumers that their debts are exempt from bankruptcy rules, but this is actually only true for a few special kinds of debt. If a collection agency provides you with inaccurate information like this, report them to the Attorney General's Office in your state.

Don't overly concern yourself with any negative feelings you are having. It is possible for those going through the bankruptcy process to feel unworthy, guilty or ashamed. These feelings, however, are of no benefit to anyone, and they can be detrimental to your mental health. Having the right outlook during a tough financial upheaval is a great attitude in coping with bankruptcy.

Be honest about your debts. When you file for bankruptcy, you need to be completely honest about your debts. If visit this page attempt to hide any income, or assets from a Trustee, you might find that the court dismisses your case. You will also be barred from re-filing any debts that were listed in that petition. Report all financial information, no matter how insignificant it may seem.

Get the details. After filing for personal bankruptcy, you are still obligated to pay your personal bills. The collection letters and some monthly bills will stop coming, but you are still required to pay them off. This means that even if you don't receive a bill to your house, it doesn't mean that you're off the hook!

Continue to pay certain bills. Once you file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you won't receive any more collection calls, and you may cease to receive certain bills. Remember that you are still under obligation to pay for your 'secured possessions', such as your home or vehicle, or you may lose them.

Don't overwhelm yourself all at once; after all, this is a tough and life altering decision that you have just proceeded to make. There is no easy way to file bankruptcy, mostly because of the emotional stress involved. However, the tips you have just read can make the process much easier to handle.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *